Clinic: 636-949-5760 | Research: 636-946-8032 | 4801 Weldon Spring PKWY, STE 300, St. Charles, MO 63304

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Overview

Autism is a brain disorder that often makes it hard to communicate and relate to others. With autism, the different areas of the brain fail to work together. Autism tends to run in families, so experts think it may be something that you inherit. Symptoms of autism are usually noticed first by parents and other caregivers sometime during the child’s first 3 years. Parents often become concerned when their toddler does not like to be held, does not seem interested in playing certain games, such as peekaboo, and does not begin to talk.  Many teens gain skills but still lag behind in their ability to relate to and understand others.
False claims in the news have made some parents concerned about a link between autism and vaccines. Studies have found no link between vaccines and autism. It’s important to make sure that your child gets all childhood vaccines. They help keep your child from getting serious diseases that can cause harm or even death.

Participate in a Study

To be considered for a research study, please complete the following information:

Symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Helpful information to know about symptoms of ASD:

  • Significant problems developing nonverbal communication skills, such as eye-to-eye gazing, facial expressions, and body posture.
  • Failure to establish friendships with children the same age.
  • Lack of interest in sharing enjoyment, interests, or achievements with others.
  • Lack of empathy or understanding another person’s feelings.
  • Delay, or lack of, talking. As many as 40% of people with autism never speak.
  • Problems taking steps to start a conversation or keeping one going.
  • Stereotyped and repetitive use of language. People with autism often repeat a phrase multiple times they have heard previously (echolalia).
  • Difficulty understanding their other people’s perspective. For example, a person with autism may not understand that someone is using humor.
  • An unusual focus on pieces. Younger children with autism often focus on parts of toys, rather than playing with the entire toy.
  • Preoccupation with certain topics. For example, older children and adults may be fascinated by video games, Pokemon cards, or books.
  • A need for structure and routine, without changes.

Research Studies

Helpful information to know about our research studies:

  • No insurance needed to receive medical care (if you qualify for a study).
  • Obtain medical care and a free psychiatric evaluation and physical exam
  • No-cost medications
  • Gain access to research treatments before they are widely available.
  • Receive compensation for time and travel (at least $50 per visit).

For more information or to find out if you qualify, please contact Nicole at (636) 946-8032.